What’s it Worth? Antique Musical Instruments

Take a cue from an antiques expert and price old-time musical instruments from the horns to the string section.

Bring in vintage vibes with old banjos and more musical collectibles.

What's it Worth? Antique Musical Instruments | Antiques | Country Woman Magazine

JACKSON L. GARRISON

Mellophone

What's it Worth? Antique Musical Instruments | Antiques | Country Woman Magazine

Accordion

What's it Worth? Antique Musical Instruments | Antiques | Country Woman Magazine

JACKSON L. GARRISON

Mandolin

What's it Worth? Antique Musical Instruments | Antiques | Country Woman Magazine

JACKSON L. GARRISON

Guitar Banjo

What's it Worth? Antique Musical Instruments | Antiques | Country Woman Magazine

JACKSON L. GARRISON

Ukelin

Bring in vintage vibes with old banjos and more musical collectibles.What's it Worth? Antique Musical Instruments | Antiques | Country Woman MagazineWhat's it Worth? Antique Musical Instruments | Antiques | Country Woman MagazineWhat's it Worth? Antique Musical Instruments | Antiques | Country Woman MagazineWhat's it Worth? Antique Musical Instruments | Antiques | Country Woman MagazineWhat's it Worth? Antique Musical Instruments | Antiques | Country Woman Magazine

 

Mellophone

Similar to a French horn but lighter and easier to play, mellophones are a favorite in concert and marching bands. C.G. Conn of Elkhart, Indiana, produced this model, now with a patina, in the 1920s-’30s.
Worth: Up to $400

Accordion

Most likely manufactured in the 1950s when the accordion craze swept the country, this learner instrument was produced in Italy and distributed under the United brand by Don Noble Co. of Chicago. Today’s polka, zydeco and Tejano bands opt for more expensive models with higher quality metal reeds.
Worth: $100-$150

Mandolin

Widely known manufacturers such as Gibson and Martin made many of these string instruments, but this look-alike was created by the Chicago-based Lyon & Healy Co. Dating to the early 1900s, this mandolin is missing a string, which slightly affects its collector value.
Worth: As found, $100-$150

Guitar Banjo

With six strings instead of a normal banjo’s four or five, a guitar banjo produces a louder sound. These were often used as rhythm instruments in minstrel and Dixieland bands. Lyon & Healy Co. made this particular piece around 1920.
Worth: $100-$300

Ukelin

Considered to be novelty instruments, these violin-ukulele hybrids can be played with a bow or by plucking the strings. The International Music Co. of Hoboken, New Jersey, made this one around 1910. The fading graphics on this example alter its collector value.
Worth: In prime condition, $150-$200

Tune Up Your Home

LittleShirley 1 March 4, 2016 at 1:17 pm

I took an my grandfather’s violin with its bow and invested $12 in a reproduction of a newspaper front page that says “Titanic Sinks”. I then framed them under glass with the violin across the newspaper . You can read the story and see pictures of the ship and its captain all around the instrument. It looks like a museum piece and I have had people ask me if my grandfather was on the ship.
The original violin of the bandmaster on the Titanic was found and sold for $2 million. Mine looks great for a whole lot less.

Reply

Richard Rushlo 2 March 4, 2016 at 6:54 pm

Could you tell me how much a Martin Guitar made in 1930/

Reply

Richard Rushlo 3 March 5, 2016 at 1:10 pm

Could you tell me the price of a Martin Guitar serial number 43460? Thank You

Reply

Leave a Comment